An Author's Life for Me

Thursday, August 26, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 11

coda the last paragraph of a chapter, when the author abandons the main point of view (POV) in favor of another POV. The effect is a palate cleanser and also reveals elements that the POV character doesn't see. It can be disorienting to the reader if not done with care, and should probably be used... Sign in to see full entry.

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 10

echo A word or phrase that repeats throughout the work, but each time it picks up new meaning or additional baggage, so that when it is used at a key point, it has a viseral effect on the reader. (Run for the Hankies). A good example is from the film Ghost, (many authorial techniques come from or... Sign in to see full entry.

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 9

mentorial homage A phrase or reference borrowed from the author's mentor, slipped in as an easter egg somewhere in the manuscript as a homage to that mentor. An example, from my own work - In one novel I have a Chapter called The Battle of the Somme. The chapter is not about the Battle of the Somme.... Sign in to see full entry.

Sunday, August 22, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 8

temporal slip A technique to begin a chapter by slipping back in the second paragaph by a few moments and then playing catch-up. Works best with a dialog statement. "That's terribly loud, you know," Hildegard said. Then in the next sentence. He had been in the quiet bathroom and decided to take a... Sign in to see full entry.

Saturday, August 21, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 7

Hanging a lantern This is the act of drawing the readers attention to a logic lapse (eventhough the author may not correct it), before the reader gets a chance to find it and lessen their credibility in the story. Such lapses are essential for pace and exposition and, if corrected, would tear the... Sign in to see full entry.

Friday, August 20, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 6

Sequel or Sequeling NOT a second book in a series (a misnomer), but a section, usually at the beginning of a chapter when a character reviews the situation, generally from the previous chapter. Such reviews in situ would soften the effect of the action, but the absence of reaction from the character... Sign in to see full entry.

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon

Jimeny Cricketing Having the point of view character hear the words of their mentor during a sequel. Almost like bringing the reader onto the character's left shoulder (or right according to your political persuasion). Edward C. Patterson Sign in to see full entry.

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 4

comma roulade The defiance of the chain noun comma rule ( he ate pancakes, eggs and tomatillo salad ) by substituting a conjunction, such as and or or. Lions and tigers and bears, oh my. An excellent way to heighten reader tension, and followed by a throwaway word, brings things to a screeching... Sign in to see full entry.

Monday, August 16, 2010

A Reader's Gide to Author's Jargon 3

cadence a sentence or paragraph at the end of a section or chapter that leaves the reader at rest, happy or even sublime. Edward C. Patterson Sign in to see full entry.

Sunday, August 15, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 2

Roman a clef or Roman a cle A novelized memoir. Technically (from the French) a romance with a key. A true life story veiled in fiction. Edward C. Patterson Sign in to see full entry.

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