The Effulgence Within > Comments on The Unfoldment of the Inherent Divinity n Man.

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Aba

I love this comment you made. Precisely, wisdom is knowing one knows nothing absolutely. And often it takes a learning process to attain the knowledge to know we know nothing. We, in my immediate family, were brought up often learning facts presented in a neutral fashion. Always was the option of questioning and/or take-it-or-leave-it; however, consequences were also presented, as appropriate for children/teens. :) Thank you, so glad to inspire you to write. An honor.   

posted by RPresta on February 11, 2017 at 4:42 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Aba

Sanskrit, initially, appears to be very daunting, even to the point of being intimidating. But once you learn the basics, it whets one's appetite to learn more and more. The beauty is unmatched, so also are its teachings without any commands, and mind you they are not limited only to the religious but all aspects of life encapsulated. . .  The attitude is neutral, 'Take it or leave it'. Wisdom is totally  different from knowledge; they are not synonymous. Knowledge is ‘to know about things’; wisdom is to know that ‘I don't know anything’. Sounds ironical? Your intelligent comment once again inspires me to include this idea in my next entry. I love it when I can make a blog from a comment. So, thanks dear Presta, once again. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 10, 2017 at 10:57 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Aba

Aba, most definitely, my best guess is that Sanskrit is complex. I think we can learn many things if we are taught and have the desire to learn. Wisdom comes from learning and then learning how to think, imho. I much appreciate your answer. There is a lot to ponder and it is very interesting. Thank you so much. And yes, it coud turn into a complete blog. 

posted by RPresta on February 10, 2017 at 10:06 PM | link to this | reply

Re: anibenerjee

Thank you kind Sir for your loving gifts in kindliness. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 9, 2017 at 10:46 PM | link to this | reply

Re: sam

Thanks, and if only they could profess 

posted by anibanerjee on February 9, 2017 at 10:41 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Excellent! Universal longings indeed

Many thanks Katray for your well-considered comment, and I am glad that you touched the essence very pointedly. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 9, 2017 at 10:40 PM | link to this | reply

anibenerjee

posted by WileyJohn on February 9, 2017 at 10:22 AM | link to this | reply

I liked the love for God! I really don't hear many people profess it enough! Shelly 

posted by sam444 on February 7, 2017 at 4:59 PM | link to this | reply

Excellent! Universal longings indeed

The stages are at differing levels but are at least reaching toward the truth; perhaps in curling or roundabout fashion...:) Most interesting and informative post.

posted by Katray2 on February 7, 2017 at 10:08 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba

You are always so highly appreciative if my contributions. And I accept this with humility. I seem to have affinity with things complex. Learning Sanskrit was one, but there are treasures and treasures all the way. Your questions is very apt, 'Why is it that we as a people collectively possess an innate quest for the Divine?' Because, it was in Divinity we were all born. That is the very Source. We have strayed too far since then to be remembering our home, whence we started journeying. Isn't Home the place of ultimate rest? Another way to understand this, suppose something was ours once and then we lost it. Whatever is not ours no yearning can ever arise to find it. The only difference is that when your home is burgled you remember what all has gone missing. But in this case the memory has been washed away through innumerable births,  as in sleep you rarely remember your dreams, but for some you have a faint inkling because these dreams were in part-conscious, part-unconscious state. The Ojas in our memory, a record of all past births, remains inactivated unless that inkling becomes a passionate 'do or die' kind of thing. Then begins the real homeward journey. This too can turn into a complete blog, but I think I'll dwell on it much later when we can relate to it more easily. Thank you dear Presta for your most pertinent and stimulating query. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 6, 2017 at 10:18 PM | link to this | reply

Re: C C T

Your observation is perfect. The mind wants no disturbance, despite it being packed with bog. That is the reason why orthodoxy occupies such voluminous space in societies. I believe in whipping the mind to keep it flexible, accommodating. And it serves so well in old age, Lol! 

posted by anibanerjee on February 6, 2017 at 9:43 PM | link to this | reply

Good Blog Abba , I guess for most it would be a job to assimilate anything other than what they have been taught from childhood. It is there locked into their minds as being the truth .,if ever there could be such a thing. What most want obviously is comfort.perhaps those with deep spiritual beliefs are the most worthy of all in that order.

.

posted by C_C_T on February 6, 2017 at 12:54 AM | link to this | reply

Aba

What an enlightening post! I thank you so very much, dear Aba! You have presented these complex teachings so beautifully and in such a way that all may be able to understand that you must be commended. "Transcend all dogmas and rituals" speaks volumes. The point is clear, and one of my favorite parts of your post. The other phrase that spoke to me was "man's quest for the Divine." It does seem that there is an innate quest for the Divine that we as a people collectively possess. And I am left with the question, why? Well done, and again, thank you. 

posted by RPresta on February 6, 2017 at 12:36 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: You present all the good points of Hindusim...

Pls ignore some typos there. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 5, 2017 at 9:00 PM | link to this | reply

Re: You present all the good points of Hindusim...

Thank you GoldenMean for the insightful comment. The caste system is a bane on Hindusm and, as you know, everywhere, it is the politicians butting in to make capital of any given situation. The ancient Hindu caste system was devoid of any  hierarchical basis, rather it was the principle of work-division as per an individual's ability and capacity. And the division was not vertical but horizontal. For example, the Brahmanas, the educated teacher class, dispensed with knowledge and in exchange they got alms from which they made living. The Kshatriyas were the warrior breed that offered protection to the society from outer/inner invasions, the Brahmanas being the teachers were also guru to them in teaching the art of arms and weapon-skll, were greatly revered too. Then came the Vaishyas, the trader class who did not produce themselves but bought from the farmers at a lower and sold these at good margins of profit. Lastly, came the Shudras or the eneducated class to carry out orders, doing menial jobs! they were meant, or capable of to earn their livelihood. Dalits are  of this class. The arrangement worked perfectly to run the society smoothly of the yore. But I do agree this has no relevance in today's times. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 5, 2017 at 8:57 PM | link to this | reply

You present all the good points of Hindusim...

....  and I am learning from them,  and I thank you for it.  How sad that many in India still observe the rigid caste system.  I saw a news story just the other day that a member of the 'untouchable' class  (Dalit or Panchama),  was badly beaten for merely pausing just a moment at the entrance of a Hindu temple.  The oppression of the Dalits in India is a horrible blemish on the Hindu religion,  despite laws that try to stop that oppression.  I am curious if you think there is any justification for the caste system in general?  

posted by GoldenMean on February 5, 2017 at 8:21 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba

Do take your own time, dear. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 5, 2017 at 8:11 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba

Do take your own time, dear. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 5, 2017 at 8:11 PM | link to this | reply

Re:

Yes, there are in accordance with one's innate nature. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 5, 2017 at 8:10 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Annicita

Thank you for sending that fragrant rose. 

posted by anibanerjee on February 5, 2017 at 8:09 PM | link to this | reply

Aba

Thank you very much, ABA. Will comment later when I can read, study and absorb what you've written. 

posted by RPresta on February 5, 2017 at 11:12 AM | link to this | reply

There are different ways in which to attain salvation, I feel.

posted by FormerStudentIntern on February 5, 2017 at 9:48 AM | link to this | reply

posted by Annicita on February 5, 2017 at 7:29 AM | link to this | reply

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