The Effulgence Within

Friday, October 23, 2009

CLOUDS

I’d have to be really quick to describe clouds - a split second’s enough for them to start being something else. Their trademark: they don’t repeat a single shape, shade, pose, arrangement. Unburdened by memory of any kind, they float easily over the facts. What on earth could they bear witness to?... Sign in to see full entry.

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Why ‘Rest’ in the bottom lay?

I recently read a disarmingly simple ( intricate though in its use of similes, metaphors and conceits ) and an exquisite poem by George Herbert, a 17 th century poet who died young, at forty, in 1633. He has been rightfully called the saint of the Metaphysical school. His poem, The Pulley, is a... Sign in to see full entry.

Saturday, October 17, 2009

A Tragedy of Reconciliation

The day before it was vogue’s ‘ Cleo screams', and today, a comment from isiSEyes triggered this post on A and C. The impression left us at the close of Shakespeare’s play Antony and Cleopatra can scarcely be called purely tragic. The feeling of reconciliation, which mingles with the obviously... Sign in to see full entry.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

Cleopatra's Redemption

Inspired by vogue's "And Cleo screams some more...", and her comment's page. You'll find some excellent humorous writes by Hackthorne19 and Sinome... Here. I enjoyed doing this from a different angle. Shakespeare loved to show his heroes with flaws and doubts and unheroic impulses, and heroines... Sign in to see full entry.

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Gods of Paradisiac Languor?

The long-drawn ten years’ war in Troy has ended. The ship of Odysseus (that is, Ulysses) sets sail for homeward journey. The mariners sight land. A few of them go to explore the region. The air, languid, all quiet reigned. The streams seemed slumberous in movement. It was a land where nothing... Sign in to see full entry.

Monday, October 12, 2009

The Abiding in the Transient

Alfred, LordTennyson’s lyric “ Tears, Idle Tears ” expresses the deepest feelings of sadness with graceful fluency. The lyric wonders as to the meaning of tears that spring from our innermost depths and making way through the heart collect in the eyes. And the selfsame tears fill our eyes when the... Sign in to see full entry.

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Ecstatic Joy of Transcendence

A brief synopsis of yesterday's two stanzas of Pablo Neruda's poem and then to the concluding ones... The true poetic genius of Pablo Neruda found expression in the conveyance of the mystical through his use of bold metaphors. In “ Ah Vastness of Pines ”, approaching a pine grove, the fading light... Sign in to see full entry.

Monday, October 5, 2009

Spanish Love Poems

Here is the Link to a Pablo Neruda poem of which (for lack of time), I have just been able to do the first two stanzas. The other two, in my subsequent posts. Ah Vastness of Pines Published in 1924 and one of his best-known poems, Pablo Neruda’s " Ah Vastness of Pines" is both sensuous and boldly... Sign in to see full entry.

Saturday, October 3, 2009

Humanity transcending the Clevage of War

Wilfred Owen’s Strange Meeting is a protest, not simply against war but against the glamorizing of war. If we think of it as a dream, it is founded on actual incidents of soldiers whom the poet saw die in the tunneled dug-outs. Escaping into a “profound dull tunnel” the poet comes on “encumbered... Sign in to see full entry.

Friday, October 2, 2009

Patriotism alone is not enough

On the outbreak of the World War of 1914, the war verse of Rupert Brooke stimulated the imagination of the English people, the key piece being supplied by his The Soldier. This celebrated sonnet is neither jingoistic nor gushingly emotional. It expresses in melodious verse Brooke’s unruffled through... Sign in to see full entry.

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