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Re: Re: Re: Aba Brother

I'm almost free today at the college, and so can do my studying on both The Thunder and Tiresias. I find, to be organize those broken thought into what can make sense, quite stimulating. So thank you sis. 

posted by anibanerjee on September 21, 2017 at 10:44 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Aba Brother

Yes, I would like to see and know more about What the Thunder Said, and Eliot how  found his peace in the Shantih, shantih, shantih. Did he not end the poem with those words? The seer Tiresias is fascinating also. And no, grasping the mind of Eliot is, or would be, most difficult. Perhaps he even didn't know what he was thinking part of the time and may have written in a stream of consciousness.  

posted by RPresta on September 21, 2017 at 10:16 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba Brother

Hello Presta my big sis. The mind of this genius was simply exceptional. It is not easy to put all that was going on in his thoughts all at once. It was frustration evident from almost all his poems like the Preludes, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, The Portrait of a Lady, except for Journey of the Magi  It was mainly from the Hindu analogies that he found hope and solace which he studied in depth. He mentions in his fifth part of this poem Waste Land, in Whst the Thunder Said, Shantih, shantih, shantih, tha peace that passeth all understanding. My reply to Kabu 'mechanical' is probably an answer to love without feeling. Would you want that I write on What The Thunder Said? I hope you'll find it interesting, though analysing Eliot's poems are no easy task. And then there the great ancient seer Tiresias, from whose 'blind' eyes, Eliot sees and shows us all. 

posted by anibanerjee on September 21, 2017 at 9:44 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Aba Brother, Kabu

Eliot suffered the devastation and the resultant confusion created thereof, of the post-war, both WWI and II. Human life, for him, had degenerated into being mechanical. I think that probably explains 'love without feeling'. 

posted by anibanerjee on September 21, 2017 at 9:26 PM | link to this | reply

Re: anibanerjee

Thank you, Sir Wiley

posted by anibanerjee on September 21, 2017 at 9:20 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Annicita

many thanks

posted by anibanerjee on September 21, 2017 at 9:20 PM | link to this | reply

posted by Annicita on September 21, 2017 at 3:38 PM | link to this | reply

anibanerjee

Captivating!!!!

posted by WileyJohn on September 20, 2017 at 4:07 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba Brother

Presta dear there cannot be love without feeling only physical coupling. and \i think perhaps you are correct. For me the end makes little sense without your explanation, the author himself coming out of some great depression state.

posted by Kabu on September 20, 2017 at 11:54 AM | link to this | reply

Aba Brother

Again, outstanding discussion of a superb writer and his wonderful poem. I know he had some mental issues, and wonder if perhaps, in addition to the styles of writing of the times, and all the points you have saliently brought to light, his disconnected marriage and state of mind may have contributed to the poem's final version, or one of the versions. He was clearly a genius with multiple thoughts in his mind at all times, I think. The peace, hope and salvation at the end of the poem may represent himself coming through a difficult period and stepping into a better time. One thing though, how does one experience love without feeling? Love is feeling. LOL! Outstanding job for us, li'l bro! Thank you.

posted by RPresta on September 20, 2017 at 1:20 AM | link to this | reply

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