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Re: Re: Anib to GM

Cut the undated in brackets.

posted by anibanerjee on July 20, 2017 at 4:49 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Anib to GM

Very interesting, the way have described. I couldn't stop myself from laughing especially the discomfort  of the kneeling or cross-legged position the firangi (undated not farangi) had had to take. The chanting is basically in Sankrit mixed with some Buddhist words, especially in Om Namo Padme Hum, one Buddhist Padme. It is supposed to have an atmosphere cleaning effect. In all yoga, the first step is to chastise the body so that it can sit still, undisturbed. Only after you have mastered the bodily discomforts, then begins the mental meditation part through breath control etc.. So I can understand why in your meditation classes you felt only relaxation of some kind and not any spiritual connect. I can sit in those positions for almost an hour, Lol. Cheers

posted by anibanerjee on July 20, 2017 at 4:48 AM | link to this | reply

Anib

Your phonetic translation of Sanskrit into English letters is very interesting.  It reminds me of the chanting of Buddhist monks in Thailand,  when we have them come to our house to perform a ceremony of blessing,  or a ceremony honoring my wife's long-dead mother,  who passed away when my wife was about 18.  I think they are chanting in Sanskrit.  It is very rythymic and sing-songy.  They chant on for 10, 15 minutes,  with all of us sitting on the floor in a kneeling position that is torture for me,  the farang  (westerner).  As each position becomes uncomfortable almost immediatley,  I keep shifting around,  moving my legs this way and that,  shifting my body to this side or that,  always with my hands in prayer position in front of me,  so that my hands are unavailable to help support my weight.  I am sure the Thais are thinking this farang is so soft and out of shape,  LOL.

But back to the Sanskrit,  it is like listening to a song,  although a song of only a few notes,  and it is dominated by the "a" and "i" sounds,  just as in your translation.  Ra, na, sa, ha, pi, shi, ri,  etc.  I would never be able to learn it,  even with meditation.  I took meditation classes in college,  and it helped me learn how to relax,  but I never felt any cosmic benefit from it.  I guess I am just a hopeless farang,  LOL.  Cheers 

 

posted by GoldenMean on July 20, 2017 at 12:24 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Aba Brother

No one in fact. It comes from meditating. I struggled after once I felt so low and cornered with whales of problems, including monetary, that to find some solace in the Gita I began to read. Initially it even revolted me.  Later, I did find courage and strength from such vast intelligence, as if coming from, as GM says, our cosmic superiors. That is a part of the verse describing the non-volutary actions, those that happen automatically and over which we can exercise any control. Karma is wilful actions over which we can exercise reins, other than those thirteen. 

posted by anibanerjee on July 19, 2017 at 10:24 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Aba Brother

Ten years! Who taught you the pronunciation? I tried reading the verse, but with no breaks, it is difficult. If they don't form Karma, what do they form, or unform? My back is doing better. It is still very sensitive, and I must move carefully or I feel it beginning to spasm again. I shouldn't be on this computer so much yet. Thank you for asking. This has been terrible. My brother had this happen to him in January. Another week or so, I'm hoping, and it should be better. 

posted by RPresta on July 19, 2017 at 10:06 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Aba Brother

I found it sweet, your 'casually'. There are many meanings in their complicated system of writing, one word joined with the other, so to isolate these paragraphical words often becomes tough and needs mental training to do so and isolate. It took me ten years to pronounce them correctly. For example, try reading this from one of the verses in the fifth chapter, pashyanshrinvansprishanjighranashnangachchanswapanshwasanpralapavisrijangrihnanunmishannimishanapi. These are voluntary actions, 13 of them that doesn't form Karma; they are called kriyas. Doesn't that call for a big ha ha! Thank you so much big sis, and how is your back pain now? Better? There is a rhythmic beat to it that sounds very pleasing to the ears. 

posted by anibanerjee on July 19, 2017 at 9:45 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Anib

Thank you GM that you find the main thread of the story is proper, and yes, the current crop of radicals liberals would not be so true to truth or justice. 'Honour among thieves' is definitely superior to honour among 'so-called' honourables, in the sense that thieves would never divulge on another's theivery, and their distribution process too, is flawlessly just. Interesting, isn't it? Cheers

posted by anibanerjee on July 19, 2017 at 9:28 PM | link to this | reply

Anib

This is a very complex story,  and you tell it well.  As RP says,  just reading it is a feat in itself.  I find it interesting that the females in the story are cast as demon spawn,  and they act accordingly,  then one of them is wisely counselled and corrected by her wise father,  even though he is somewhat demonic himself,  but is acting virtuously here.  Could this be a case of  "honor among thieves?"  There are many apparent contradictions here.  But the main thread is excellent and clear.

I think this main thread is proper,  of a demonic daughter being corrected by her wise father,   but it would be condemned and rejected by the current crop of radical liberals and feminists.  Cheers  

posted by GoldenMean on July 18, 2017 at 4:15 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Re: Aba Brother

How causally you mention Sanskrit being a very rich language! Just reading it is a feat in itself, not to mention the translation abilities required to convey to us, as Westerners. The message in terminology to which we can relate. Much appreciated, brother Aba. And well done. 

posted by RPresta on July 18, 2017 at 1:57 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Annicita

Thanks, and am glad you like it so

posted by anibanerjee on July 17, 2017 at 9:09 PM | link to this | reply

this piece is inspiring

posted by Annicita on July 17, 2017 at 8:08 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Aba Brother

Thank you sister Presta for a second read, These writings I am both enjoying and sharing because I find these meaningfully true and so close to our own experiences, that we tend to overlook or even ignore, so reminders become necessary. They are somewhat long but it helps me with newer perspectives of writing styles, the appropriate words, sense, sequence etc. That way Sanskrit is a very rich language, it makes you think and cogitate before you can start on how to go about. 

posted by anibanerjee on July 16, 2017 at 9:17 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Aba Brother

So sorry I got so sidetracked with relating the one section to myself that I did overlook the anger management aspect when commenting. Humiliation, pride, anger, self-image, verbal cruelty, all important parts of your writings here. And very valuable. I did so enjoy reading, dear Aba brother. 

posted by RPresta on July 16, 2017 at 8:30 PM | link to this | reply

Well I found this intriguing without even qualifying the purpose . Strange really when I read the comments most were drawn to the ideals of the piece. Very good writing and quite readable. Modesty hopefully lives on somewhere.

posted by C_C_T on July 16, 2017 at 7:55 AM | link to this | reply

Re:

Many thanks for your reading, Shamaji

posted by anibanerjee on July 16, 2017 at 5:47 AM | link to this | reply

Great lesson on 'Anger' management in our ancient texts.Thanks for sharing.

posted by shamasehar on July 16, 2017 at 2:48 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba Brother

I am glad you could relate it with your own experience/s. These tales have that peculiar way of conveying morals embodied in truth and are therefore universally appealing.  

posted by anibanerjee on July 15, 2017 at 8:51 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Kabu

That is such a wonderful thing you do on Saturday nights. Your personlaity makes you acceptable in any group congregation. 

posted by anibanerjee on July 15, 2017 at 8:46 PM | link to this | reply

Aba Brother

The wise and the great are often truly humble. I have found this to be so, as well as having learned it in my studies. They have no need to brag. And how true, one is never too old to learn from a parent. Wonderful post, dear brother Aba, and so on point. It takes me back to days when my own father dispensed his wisdom, until he was no longer with us. 

posted by RPresta on July 15, 2017 at 8:40 PM | link to this | reply

Sayin' hi. Will read soon.

posted by RPresta on July 15, 2017 at 6:54 PM | link to this | reply

I go to a meeting dear friend on Saturday nights and how those people are teaching me about listening to advice and having humility. I am not one of them but they still accept me and I feel so truly blessed to have them in my life.

posted by Kabu on July 15, 2017 at 6:36 PM | link to this | reply

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