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Aww, Did you hurt your little toe?  
Such interesting flora and fauna you have in Australia.  I don't thing there is anything
like that one here.

posted by TAPS. on September 10, 2008 at 6:24 PM | link to this | reply

thanks Ciel..

posted by robdon67 on September 9, 2008 at 2:04 PM | link to this | reply

here's the link

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_madrone

 

apparently, not a relation of your gum tree.

posted by Ciel on September 8, 2008 at 7:52 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: What kind of tree is this?
Madrona are also known as 'widow-makers' because of being brittle.  I suppose I should look it up now...  Let's see, where did I put that wikipedia...?

posted by Ciel on September 8, 2008 at 7:47 PM | link to this | reply

Very cool, I have never seen anything like it! I would be interested in finding out what kind of tree it is too!  sam

posted by sam444 on September 8, 2008 at 11:53 AM | link to this | reply

Re: What kind of tree is this?

Thanks for the question Ciel... after a bit of research here's the answer thanks to wikipedia

Angophora costata is a common woodland and forest tree of Eastern Australia and is known by a variety of names including Smooth-barked apple, Rose Gum, Rose Apple or Sydney Red Gum. It grows primarily on sandstone soils, usually on headlands, plateaus or other elevated areas. A. costata differs from the majority of gum trees in that it is not a Eucalyptus, but rather a closely related genus. A. costata is a large, wide, spreading tree growing to a height of between 15 and 25 m. The trunk is often gnarled and crooked with a pink to pale grey, sometimes rusty-stained bark. The timber is brittle and limbs tend to fall readily. In nature the butts of such limbs form callused bumps on the trunk and add to the gnarled appearance. The old bark is shed in spring in large flakes with the new salmon-pink bark turning to pale grey before the next shedding.

More recently, genetic work has been published showing Angophora to be more closely related to Eucalyptus than Corymbia, and the name Eucalyptus apocynifolia has been proposed for this species if it were to be placed in the eucalypt genus.

posted by robdon67 on September 8, 2008 at 1:11 AM | link to this | reply

What kind of tree is this?
Looks like it might be related to madronas, another bare-skin sort of tree, that grows around the Northwest US.

posted by Ciel on September 7, 2008 at 3:39 PM | link to this | reply

Maybe a child hanging upside down in a tree?...

posted by lovelyladymonk on September 7, 2008 at 3:04 PM | link to this | reply

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