The Effulgence Within > Comments on Faustus' Last Soliloquy Just Before he is Carried Away to Hell

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Re: Re: there's no

posted by anibanerjee on November 16, 2016 at 8:10 PM | link to this | reply

Re:

People who are adament to the extreme meet such a fate. Tger'sno let up even after death. 

posted by anibanerjee on November 16, 2016 at 8:09 PM | link to this | reply

I guess he met his death as he lived his life - all with Hells fury as well.

posted by shobana on November 16, 2016 at 5:00 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: well said, dear Kabu

posted by Kabu on November 15, 2016 at 4:01 PM | link to this | reply

Re: it does, FSI.

posted by anibanerjee on November 14, 2016 at 8:16 PM | link to this | reply

Re: well said, dear Kabu

posted by anibanerjee on November 14, 2016 at 8:15 PM | link to this | reply

It plays very well to the emotions.

posted by FormerStudentIntern on November 13, 2016 at 6:38 AM | link to this | reply

I have no Calvanist visions of a God of anger who sends people off the eternal toture in Hell. Faust for me portrays the soul who will not of their own free will accept their God. Even to the last breathe they fight death because for them they cannot see what they will as they cross that bridge. That would be for me Hell. To be without my God in my life.

posted by Kabu on November 12, 2016 at 1:08 PM | link to this | reply

Re: great! "Cogito ergo sum" - even comparison w beasts who die once REVEAL

Cogito ergo sum. I think, that is why I am. That's a good one from Rene Descartes. I am so glad that you have liked my contribution. Many thanks. 

posted by anibanerjee on November 12, 2016 at 4:29 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Aba

Oh no, that's not what I meant. In fact I am enjoying quite thoroughly, it helps me meditate, contemplate. The best I like is when one asks. So please don't ever stop asking (harping) ...LOL   It is a very stimulating experience for me.

posted by anibanerjee on November 12, 2016 at 4:25 AM | link to this | reply

great! "Cogito ergo sum" - even comparison w beasts who die once REVEAL

to the once proud Faustus, God has a higher standrad for us. Mere beastly living will not do. With every sign of His Love & Judgment (yes, BOTH!), God has given us all the chances we need. The Bible says "pride of life" is one gate to hell. Shalom amen

posted by NocrossJustchristmas on November 12, 2016 at 2:23 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Aba

Well, Aba, pay me no mind! :) As Henry VIII had said, I will stop plucking on that harp string (stop your harping, the expression).  I know ol' Meph wasnt responsible. Yes, a thought-provoking series, is correct. Wonderfully done. Thank you for your time with this one. I feel you, and wisely, wish to move on to another topic!  :) 

posted by RPresta on November 12, 2016 at 12:54 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba

Oh, so many good queries, all at once! You will take the steam out of me Presta dear, joking, LOL :) I will probably have to do another on as to what was the central interest of the play. Mephistophilis the Devil, was not responsible for Faustus' tragedy and was also not without good qualities. (If you want me to carry on further, that is). Thank you so much for such a close reading, and commenting beautifully and intelligently all through ... the series ... (If that's the right word to use). 

posted by anibanerjee on November 12, 2016 at 12:18 AM | link to this | reply

Aba

Thank you for this very good explanation, deat Aba. In one of my first comments on Faustus, I mentioned the Christian belief of forgiveness with repentance up until the last minute of the last hour of the last day, as UKUSA, whom I am certain is much more well-versed than I on Scripture and Doctorine, :) also mentioned. It appears that there may be a hint (actually, to me, more than a hint throughout) in this last soliloquy where Faustus pleads with Christ to save his soul, with even a half of a drop of blood. The thinking here on the part of Marlowe, aside from catering to Calvinists, is a paradox to me since Marlowe was an Atheist. Why have Faustus plead at all, and to no avail, only to have him end with the Devil. He did offer to burn his books at the very end... Did Marlowe want to show that Faustus didn't take responsibility for his actions, had no remorse, therefore couldn't be saved? Yet that still seems contrary to forgiveness offered in Scripture. Or was Marlowe saying since there is no God, no Christ, there is no redemption. But then why have an afterlife with an eternity in Hell with the Devil, if there is no God? Ah, did Marlow get it wrong, write it wrong at the end? But who are we to say how his play should have ended? And, I detected a hint of Alchemy thrown in, heresy for sure! :) This one (the play's meaning) does baffle me a bit. 

posted by RPresta on November 11, 2016 at 11:10 PM | link to this | reply

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