The Effulgence Within > Comments on Faustus: an Extension of Marlowe's Renaissance Temper (inspired by RPresta)

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Re: Re: yes dear Shobs

Contrasted ... U no the no. Of typos I make.

posted by anibanerjee on November 16, 2016 at 8:16 PM | link to this | reply

Re: yes dear Shobs

The seeking after secret knowledge for attaining power, con treatised with the seeking after secret knowledge for the good of all is beautifully explained in Shakesoeare's The Tempest. Pemeber Prospero the character. He forgave the wrong-doers his brother, Alonso. 

posted by anibanerjee on November 16, 2016 at 8:15 PM | link to this | reply

Well necromancy and conjuration is something vile and sinister and to seek redress or forgiveness makes Fautus look shallow and not genuine in his attempt to be forgiven.

posted by shobana on November 16, 2016 at 4:54 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Kabu

posted by Kabu on November 10, 2016 at 2:58 PM | link to this | reply

Re: yes you can say that FSI. Many thnx.

posted by anibanerjee on November 9, 2016 at 8:31 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Kabu

i think we use our own discretion in what we follow or not. Best of luck walking in the woods and sa or the warmth of the day. 

posted by anibanerjee on November 9, 2016 at 8:30 PM | link to this | reply

Re: I agree with RP & U about the writing.Jesus, says something different re.

You very rightly say so UKUSA. Since I find interest generated in the  topic I'll continue some more discussions on the story so that it may raise those questions that Marlowe went wrong in and we have the correct perspective of the aberrations in the play. Thanx a lot.

posted by anibanerjee on November 9, 2016 at 8:24 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba

Marlowe's considering redemption through Faustus is the natural consequence of the play. I'll have to tailor the language to cater to this question because I see your queries thoughtful, and they do need considered answers. Thank you so very much. I hope this should be covered in Faustus' last soliloquy. 

posted by anibanerjee on November 9, 2016 at 8:19 PM | link to this | reply

He had a very interesting life.

posted by FormerStudentIntern on November 9, 2016 at 6:51 AM | link to this | reply

Never was or am a follower of Marlowe but that is OK. It takes radical people to bring change and the World is ever in need of change. I am going for a walk in the Woods today when the day warms up and commune with my Gof and regenerate my energies.

posted by Kabu on November 9, 2016 at 5:38 AM | link to this | reply

I agree with RP & U about the writing.Jesus, says something different re.

regarding SALVAION of one's eternal soul. That there is a chance to repent when humans may think it is too late for Mr. T or Miss. S. God's mercy & love is not contained in human formulations: God's immense "loving kindness" is the mother of what we try to call  L O V E. That love also is JESUS on a cruel CROSS - Marlowe is not unique, Adam & Eve made a similar bargain, as did all humans other than Noah and his 7 family members on the ark. Or more recently, in the Stevenson classic, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." All permutations of selling one's soul for an extra lease on carnal life, are embodied in these litearry themes, motifs, & writers ... plagued by their indecision about God's way, or the way of the Mind/Reason/Independence. shalom, shalom - and thanks always for inspiring & adding to serious questions.

posted by NocrossJustchristmas on November 9, 2016 at 2:45 AM | link to this | reply

Aba

Ah, thank you, so wonderfully written. And, so interesting to read; to contemplate. The paradox of intellectualism, and intellect is that it often runs parallel to doubts about traditional religions, or any religion, but can be reconciled. A topic for consideration later, perhaps... Marlowe's secret studies of the occult would have been the end of him; hence the necessity for secretiveness; much as in Leonardo's time when the pursuit of knowledge was restricted. Marlowe's passion for knowledge infinite, as reflected in Faustus, is also reflected in the mirror of humankind, to a degree. In other words, we are are tempted to pursue things of the darker side, to a degree. It is human nature, and we attempt to transcend that. Marlow may have been somewhat self-absorbed, or merely self-aware, revealing, perhaps subconsciously, his darker, more unappealing side as portrayed in his way of dealing with Faustus in the play. Your ending paragraph, Aba, is so on point, and one still wonders if perhaps Marlowe was asking for, or considering, the possibility of redemption for himself if necessary, through Faustus, on some level. I do love the soliloquy to Helen of Troy, and look forward to your post about the last soliloquy before he is carried away. To me, salvation of the soul of Faustus would have been an interesting end to the play, though not as dramatic. So interesting, this post.    

posted by RPresta on November 8, 2016 at 10:18 PM | link to this | reply

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