The Effulgence Within > Comments on The Design of the Cosmic Will

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Re: Re: Re: Kabu
I quite like your obsuervation that what you were taught as newer concepts were not at al new.ha ha. That is how it is in reality.

posted by anibanerjee on June 12, 2017 at 6:33 PM | link to this | reply

Re: C C T
The brilliance is in the wonderment as to how could those ancients conceive not just only a story but stories within stories and the organic unity with all its intrigue and flawlessness! Thank you C C T.

posted by anibanerjee on June 12, 2017 at 6:29 PM | link to this | reply

Re: C C T
The brilliance is in the wonderment as to how could those ancients conceive not just only a story but stories within stories and the organic unity with all its intrigue and flawlessness! Thank you C C T.

posted by anibanerjee on June 12, 2017 at 6:29 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Kabu

yes that is what I mean. The stories and epics from the Golden period of Geece wheras I was taught were new concepts, they were not.

posted by Kabu on June 12, 2017 at 2:45 PM | link to this | reply

Again all I can say is it must take ages to translate these projects. It is quite brilliant.

posted by C_C_T on June 12, 2017 at 11:50 AM | link to this | reply

Re: dOLLYJi

'now the fallout is not a Bhagawat Gita' is something most fantastic! Arre Wah, kya baat kahi aapne, mazza aa gaya. It has pushed me deeper into analysis and I'm sure as to the reason of why of it, you fully know. 

posted by anibanerjee on June 12, 2017 at 10:50 AM | link to this | reply

The chess game of power and greed has been played always and is still popular...now the fallout is not a Bhagwat Gita...

posted by shamasehar on June 12, 2017 at 8:27 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Anib

I hope the next post will definitely afford relief. Basically, the story is  after all, man's, and in that sense, it must begin from human faults no matter how ancient; they are timeless and universal. From the sequence of events of this story begins what has always been your and mine and everybody's quest, that of dealing with evil or injustice (the how of it). That is our present day's  dilemma as to what should be our moral perspectives, how to deal with an unforeseen turn of events. These are timeless and relevant education we must pick up from the historical example in the minutiae of their details. Thus, it raises the drama from that of temporal soap opera. The drama was enacted in the state of present-day Haryana about 5300 years ago. The vastness and the allure of serenity in the dialogue (not discussion) cannot remain untouched from any and sundry. And as we go along we will have a refreshingly new perspective of looking at things, this I assure. Thanks GM and Cheers 

posted by anibanerjee on June 12, 2017 at 7:49 AM | link to this | reply

Anib

This is an amazing translation of yours  (and I thank you for it),  of an epic Indian historical document,  but....... it still seems to me to be a soap opera,  of human-like entities with human-like failings. 

As for the chess game....... I was highly intrigued by this,  because I love chess and play it quite well.......  I did not know that chess was played in India.......  but this cosmic chess game degraded into a foolish betting game,  just like the worst games in Las Vegas.  I have met people in Las Vegas who have squandered all their money on foolish bets,  lost their house,  and then they wanted me to help them......  sorry but no.  I did not help them,  but I hope they found someone else to help them,  or they will be now homeless,  and begging on the streets.......

I see little difference between the foolish gamblers in Las Vegas,  and these chess players in your religious epic.  Regardless of their emotions,  no man or god should bet their fate,  or the fate of others,  upon a game.  

So I hope that the next post gives us some relief from these esteemed fools,  who are making very bad choices in their lives,  and probably need some liberal psychological therapy,  LOL   Cheers 

posted by GoldenMean on June 12, 2017 at 3:31 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Re: Dear Brother Abi

Your asking has made all the difference, so thanks is due to you, big sis.

posted by anibanerjee on June 12, 2017 at 1:18 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba, dear Brother

Yes, it is worth definitely worth mentioning. And again, enhances the telling of the story. 

posted by RPresta on June 11, 2017 at 9:55 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Re: Dear Brother Abi

Thank you, and you have made it all the better for your explanation. Wonderfully told. And so helpful. 

posted by RPresta on June 11, 2017 at 9:54 PM | link to this | reply

Sister Presta, this I missed and thought worth mentioning.

Draupadi was a dazzling damsel of exceptional beauty born of an Yagna, sacrificial fire and so was her twin brother Drishtadyumna, who bacame the first General of the Pandava army. She too, on the other hand, was no less a fire-brand and very intelligent lady and was, in a way, solely instrumental in sowing the seed of war. 

posted by anibanerjee on June 11, 2017 at 9:13 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Kabu

They do indeed at a time much earlier that the Greek civilisation. Thank you for your continued interest and support, dear Kabu ma'am ?

posted by anibanerjee on June 11, 2017 at 8:23 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Dear Brother Abi

For the warrior breed, Kshatriyas, not accepting a challenge or even invitation was tantamount to cowardice and sacrificing their pride and honour and were looked down upon. Duryodhana, goaded by their wicked uncle Shakuni to invite Dhritarashtra to a game of chess where the Kauravas planned to take all from the Pandavas. Shakuni, managed to play in proxy for Duryodhana, who was invincible in the art of deceit and could play the dices at his command. It was a foregone conclusion that Shakuni, as he game progressed, slowly made Dhritarashtra stake one and one higher stake to the extent that Dhritarashtra staked the five brothers' wife (Draupadi) at the end which, of course, was immoral, and she too was lost and taken as slave-concubine of Duryodhana's object of enjoyment to the utter torturous infliction of the Pandava brothers. This, as you have asked, was the triggering factor of the impending battle between righteousness versus unroghteousness, such as  the world had never witnessed until then; springing from the moral issue of a woman being an object or property of the male-dominated society.  This loss prompted Bheem, the second elder brother of the Pandavas, a man of monumental strength (and rage) to take an oath that unless he has exacted blood of Duryodhana's second brother by his bare hands tearing open his heart, he would not rest. Dushyashana, Duryodhana's younger brother, was instrumental in attempting to pull off the saree of Draupadi to make her naked in the crowded court, but was unable to do so as Krishna went on supplying endless amount of drapery so much so that Dushyashana fell exhausted from the effort. Thanks dear Sister for asking a very pertinent question.

posted by anibanerjee on June 11, 2017 at 8:21 PM | link to this | reply

Thank you and somehow,from these teachings I feel the Freek Gods stirring to life on their Mt. Olympus.

posted by Kabu on June 11, 2017 at 5:38 PM | link to this | reply

Dear Brother Abi

Oh beautifully told. Again, it becomes clearer. I love the last line setting the stage as the beginning of the rest to come. But first, a quick question; who determined, and why, was the game of chess played in which the Pandavas lost everything? :) Or is that not important? What is to come is important, the teachings of the Bhagavad-Gita, correct? I do believe the Western mind, at least mine, unlearned on this topic, enjoys learning as you are telling us. Thank you. 

posted by RPresta on June 10, 2017 at 10:35 PM | link to this | reply

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