The Effulgence Within > Comments on Life in kinship

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Re: Re: Aba

Thank you! Yes, the spiritual vs. the secular. Of course. 

posted by RPresta on December 21, 2016 at 9:35 PM | link to this | reply

Re: O thank you, my big sis.

posted by anibanerjee on December 21, 2016 at 9:02 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Shamaji

 Only a poet of his stature can speak to the hearts with such intensity, as you so brilliantly say. You will have made my Mumbai days especial when I go avisiting my young sis. 

posted by anibanerjee on December 21, 2016 at 9:00 PM | link to this | reply

Re: TAPS

Glad you found it timely. Those in need must feel joyful and celebrate this time of the Season and all the year round. 

posted by anibanerjee on December 21, 2016 at 8:56 PM | link to this | reply

Re: Kabu

You are one lady I admire. I have felt your kindheartedness in very manyof your comments to my writes. And I keep telling myself, yes, you're right, you're right. Thank you so very much. 

posted by anibanerjee on December 21, 2016 at 8:54 PM | link to this | reply

Re: truly said FSI. Glad you liked it.

posted by anibanerjee on December 21, 2016 at 8:50 PM | link to this | reply

Only a poet of his stature could see this and give such a valuable message. Your post is a wonderful insight into a world where the heart rules.

posted by shamasehar on December 21, 2016 at 8:38 PM | link to this | reply

This is an especially good post for any time of year, but especially at this Season of remembering others, especially those in need.

posted by TAPS. on December 21, 2016 at 8:27 PM | link to this | reply

He is one with nature and I think he represents mans innate need to help the less fortunate! Another fine critique, too! Shelly 

posted by sam444 on December 21, 2016 at 5:47 PM | link to this | reply

I enjoyed your take on the poem and then answering the questions written by my dear Soul Sister. We call each other that because it is uncanny how much we think alike.

Anyway, the nurse in me cannot leave him to die frozen in a ditch. I need to take him into a warm barn with the animals that he loves and feed him warm broth. Then if he is gone the next morn I would know that was his choice. There truly are people who cannot work as we see it. Their work is actually to nurture nature and to expand the love that abides in their fellow human travelers so that others may experience the blessing of non judgmental giving.

posted by Kabu on December 21, 2016 at 9:56 AM | link to this | reply

A lot of themes still apply to today.

posted by FormerStudentIntern on December 21, 2016 at 9:40 AM | link to this | reply

Re: Aba

Good questions you have asked. To attempt answering the first four, the utilitarian world looks upon the worth of one's contribution to society, and those who don't, how the society sees him. If the old man cannot earn his keep, can he at least behold with a full  heart the beauty of the world around him? And if we insist that he does then, that too, would reduce him to an object of utility. His staff trails with him; scarcely do his feet disturb the summer dust: he is so still in look and motion... But people are moved by him. Wordsworth is appealing not to sentiment but to the Beggar's actions on human souls. The sauntering horseman does not toss the beggar a coin, but makes sure the alms are lodged safely in the man's hat. The woman at the turnpike, upon seeing him coming, leaves her booth and lifts up the latch for him to pass. The post-boy, harried with his business, Shouts to him from behind, but if he does not hear, the boy slows down his horses and passes him on the roadside without a curse upon his lips, or anger at his heart. The beggar makes others' mental health right. To be left to die as he lives, is to give him his own freedom of choice in which not only does he rejoice but takes pride in. Many thanks dear Presta for asking, and these I believe could be the possible answers to your questions. Thank you once again. 

posted by anibanerjee on December 21, 2016 at 2:19 AM | link to this | reply

Aba

Wow! This could go several ways. What does the beggar wish to do? Why is he a beggar? Is the beggar in good mental health? What is society's role? When does it interfere with the will of the beggar? Will the beggar be better off left to die as he lives? Ahh, dear Aba, far too deep for this poor mind to tread... But I would love to hear your, and other's views! Enjoyed the read, and the ride, on this one, immensely. 

posted by RPresta on December 20, 2016 at 9:25 PM | link to this | reply

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