+AMDG+ > Comments on What must a Christian believe to be called a Christian?

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amdg,
Perhaps this story I've just written about the origins of my son will anwer your question in part.  It is my opinion that a Christian is a fact, not simply a faith.  http://www.blogit.com/Blogs/Blog.aspx/You_look_fabulous_anyway/

posted by TARZANA on November 4, 2004 at 7:59 AM | link to this | reply

+AMDG+ - Putting in my little 2 cents worth.
Apparently the term "Christian" started as a derogatory nickname by the populace of Antioch, Syria, as name-calling for the Disciples of Christ.  The very first Gentile church was founded there.  Many fugitive believers scattered at the death of Stephen went there.  They began preaching, not only to the Jews, but to the Greeks also.  The citizens of Antioch were well known for their invention of nicknames.  The Biblical meaning is "adherent of Christ".   Peter accepted the name as in intself basis for persecution.  The apostles used it to mean servants of Christ.   As in everything, years have made changes.  Today anyone anywhere can use the name Christian for any belief and any purpose.  There are, though, still places where people are persecuted for bearing the name.

posted by TAPS. on August 1, 2004 at 12:21 PM | link to this | reply

where you been?

we've been missing you

posted by Xeno-x on August 1, 2004 at 11:57 AM | link to this | reply

In its most basic form...
Being a Christian is whatever it means to you as far as I'm concerned; but you won't make a whole heck of a lot of sense unless it has something to do with following the teachings of Jesus Christ.  If it involves "christs" (suffering sacrifices) of other kinds, one should make clear to others.

posted by Labguy on July 6, 2004 at 9:17 PM | link to this | reply

all lions are cats, but not all cats are lions

all who ascribe to the nicene creed are Christians (might be some of other religions)

but not all Christians ascribe to the nicene creed.

syllogism

posted by Xeno-x on July 6, 2004 at 10:01 AM | link to this | reply

Christ came for all, man-boy

posted by AnCatubh on July 5, 2004 at 7:19 PM | link to this | reply

Biblical literalists. Fine. The Bible is by men. For men.

posted by man-boy on July 4, 2004 at 7:45 PM | link to this | reply

What is a Christian?
To be in a "living relationship" with Jesus is the criterion for a Christian. Until we come to know the Living Christ, we are seekers of truth. We may carry the name of Christian because we know a great deal about Jesus and have chosen to be followers. But the fullness of the Christian message can only be actualized when we meet The Lord and "know because we know" that He lives. Be at peace!

posted by Ricci on July 3, 2004 at 8:58 PM | link to this | reply

yea,verily,yea to the Friar and W of L
westwend-
What has coercion got to do with it? Catholics beat on Prots, Prots beat on Catholics, Catholics kicked Muslim butt, Muslims kicked back. So? Doctrine was not developed by the sword. And may I remind you how many sects of Christianity there are today? Apparently 'coercion' didn't work.

Sure, a lot of things were put in place after Jesus' time. Does it make sense that he should come to earth, call disciples, tell them to go teach all nations and the teaching ends with them? "Thou art Peter and upon this rock I will build my Church" seems unequivocally clear. I read your interpretation of that and I'm very familiar with that idea. Even if Jesus was calling Peter a pebble, he's clearly speaking to him in the remarks that follow. Your reference to the mountain comes outa nowhere. What Church did he establish? What Church traces a line of disciples back to the twelve Christ chose?

It seems to me you're grasping at straws.

posted by AnCatubh on July 2, 2004 at 12:41 AM | link to this | reply

those who believe in the contents
of the Apostles' Creed are Christians.

posted by Friar__Tuck on July 1, 2004 at 8:36 PM | link to this | reply

the most populous mainstream Protestant Church will disagree with some of the tenets you lhave listed there; i.e., the Baptist Church.
So are they or are they not Christian.

You come from one direction and others come from another.

Historically, those who have disagreed with the mainstream church have been pretty well coerced into agreeing.

A lot of these tenets were put in place centuries after Yeshua walked the roads of Palestine.

I need considerably more in order to accept what you are saying.

posted by Xeno-x on June 30, 2004 at 9:59 AM | link to this | reply

Let's try that second paragraph again.

A lot of groups profess beliefs that sound similar to the basic truths of Christianity. But, when examined closely, their beliefs have radically different meanings. Jehovah’s Witnesses, for instance, believe that Jesus was the first and greatest of God’s creations, claiming a mistranslation of Colossians 1:16 as support. That text says, “For by him all things were created . . .,” but the Jehovah’s Witnesses turn that into “For by him all other things were created,” an obviously different meaning. I don’t have a citation of it handy, but the Mormons teach that, instead of God becoming man in Jesus Christ, man became God.

posted by WriterofLight on June 28, 2004 at 6:11 PM | link to this | reply

Christianity has always been defined by a set of basic core beliefs: The holy Trinity; the deity of Jesus Christ; His virgin birth; forgiveness of sins through His death on the cross for those who trust in Him for that forgiveness; His resurrection from the dead; and His future return. A true Christian church will profess these teachings, and these are what our salvation is based upon. Christian churches can and do differ on other areas of doctrine, and those issues are peripheral. What I’ve outlined here is the critical foundation upon which all else rests. Without this foundation, the structure built upon it – be it a church or an individual journey – cannot truly be called Christian, no more than someone who denies Mohammad as a prophet of God could be said to practice Islam.

 

A lot of groups profess beliefs that sound similar to the basic truths of Christianity. But, when examined closely, their beliefs have radically different meanings. Jehovah’s Witnesses, for instance, believe that Jesus was the first and greatest of God’s creations. Scripture, claiming a mistranslation of Colossians 1:16 as support. That text says, “For by him all things were created . . .,” but the Jehovah’s Witnesses turn that into “For by him all other things were created,” an obviously different meaning. I don’t have a citation of it handy, but the Mormons teach that, instead of God becoming man in Jesus Christ, man became God. 

posted by WriterofLight on June 28, 2004 at 6:08 PM | link to this | reply

westwend-I already know what I think
I want to hear other peoples ideas.

posted by AnCatubh on June 28, 2004 at 5:52 PM | link to this | reply

A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ

The Bible says that the followers of Jesus were first called Christians at Antioch [Acts 11:26]

For further clarification check back with me or ask God for yourself.  Enjoy the ride.

Sean Gray, Clear Choice News

posted by itisdone on June 28, 2004 at 5:42 PM | link to this | reply

you need to give us a list of what beliefs constitutes a christian in order for us to better reply.

posted by Xeno-x on June 28, 2004 at 3:40 PM | link to this | reply

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