An Author's Life for Me

Monday, September 27, 2010

An Reader'sGuide to Authors Jargon 41

sequeling a post action or event reacting by a single or multiple character, usually occuring in the next or subsequent chapter from the action. This is one of the key ingredients for testing an author's mettle. Any event not worth sequeling, should probably be jettisoned from the work. Sequeling... Sign in to see full entry.

Sunday, September 26, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 40

passive voice a clause or phrase that utilizes a stative verb, such as IS or HAS and generally has no object, just a subject and verb. The door opened. The tree was big. There is nothing wrong with this construction, however, when it occurs frequently, it makes for sluggish and flat writing.... Sign in to see full entry.

Saturday, September 25, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 39

theme unlike the story, which is the sum of the parts, a theme is a universal extraction from the parts. Like an orange, the story is the pulp, while the theme is the juice. Most successful novels have themes that rise like a halo from the book, but does not drive the novel. As such, themes are not... Sign in to see full entry.

Friday, September 24, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 38

logic suspenders an impossibility presented and accepted by the reader, generally as a necessity that serves art, but sometimes as a triviality that gives an author great joy. The prime example is W.S. Gilbert's setting of The Pirates of Penzance Act I on the protagonist's birthday on a sunny day on... Sign in to see full entry.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 37

kinetic redundancy this is the inclusion of redundant words when describing an action, usually as a colloquialism. ie. He kicked the door with his foot (with his foot being redundant). She clapped her hands, (her hands being redundant). I shrugged my shoulders (my shoulders being redundant). Of... Sign in to see full entry.

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 36

anapestic a rhythmic device. It’s the gallop we all know from the William Tell Overture, where the stress comes on the third syllable. Ta-ta-dum, ta-ta-dum, ta-ta-dum-dum-dum. It spices things up when things get dreary and too grammatical. It’s effective in getting the reader’s attention at the... Sign in to see full entry.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 35

red herring the introduction of a memorable object, event or character that you lead the reader to believe is crucial, but turns out to be a distraction - sleight of hand. This covers the seeding of a crucial element that is hidden in plain view. This is a popular device in mysteries. Irony is the... Sign in to see full entry.

Monday, September 20, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 34

seeding the introduction of memorable objects or characters that can be used as crucial elements later on in the story or not. Usually some irony is attached to seeding. i.e. a favorite silver letter opener might becomes the murder weapon. (I have a set of MountBlanc pens, I even name them, that... Sign in to see full entry.

Sunday, September 19, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 33

full sensing The application of the environment so the characters (and the reader) use all five senses to convey the mood. Many authors use sight and sound primarily and forget to use touch, smell and taste. As a result they spend time describing a characters wearing apparel or the nail poilish... Sign in to see full entry.

Saturday, September 18, 2010

A Reader's Guide to Author's Jargon 32

sound distraction Inserting an errant sound in a quiet or a dialog moment to break the reader's concetration but letting the outer world intrude in the inner one. For example, a seriious conversation between two lovers can become so weighted that it sags. So we insert - "A hawk cawed in the distant... Sign in to see full entry.

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